Alsace in August.

There have been three weeks of punishingly hot weather here, but today it was finally cool and we could emerge from our firmly shuttered house and enjoy the countryside.

The skies are full of huge storks . All the youngsters have successfully fledged from their roof top nests and have followed every plough and harvester to gather up the crickets, slugs and voles and turn them into gigantic terydactyl sized birds. I love seeing the white storks raise their noisy broods in such public places. They are a wonderful European sucesss story . In the Alsace they were nearly shot to extinction only a few decades ago, but now with bettter education and legal protection these truely iconic birds are flourishing once again. When I arrived in our village 8 years ago, to see a stork in the sky was a real event, but now they feed regularly in the meadows and the local school is putting up a stork basket to encourage the first pair to nest here for many years. Some things do get better!

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When stopping for a rest, I looked closely at this Douglas fir branch . There is a new cone sticky with resin, but there are also the remains of old cones, with just the sharp, strong centre remaining. Many of the traditions we associate with Christmas are said to originate in the Alsace starting with pine tree brought into the house and decorated. The old upright cone stalk looked exactly like the metal spike used to secure candles in times gone by and I wondered if this natural shape had given people the idea of attaching the little candles that illuminate Christmas trees still,  while we stand by with the fire extinguisher on Christmas Eve.

Thirty storks flew high over the garden today. The migration has started – Christmas is coming!!

 

12 thoughts on “Alsace in August.

  1. janesmudgeegarden says:

    It’s uplifting to read about the storks, Cathy. Every now and then there’s something done by humans that restores faith. It was also interesting to read your theory about the Douglas fir cones.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Driftless Roots says:

    Yes, it’s good to be reminded that some things do get better. We have had similar success restoring our Sandhills Cranes, going from rare sightings to having a family nonchalantly stalking by my office window almost daily and majestic flocks flying over during migrations. Would love to have storks, but we are too far north for now. Happy Holidays! (very, very early)

    Liked by 1 person

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