Easy pickings: prickly pickings!

 

I was pleased as punch with the first few cherry tomatoes that the garden produced this season and as the dry, hot weather has gone on; with just a little effort,  I have filled bowl after bowl with the sweet red jewels. Previous attemps to grow tomatoes have resulted in little to eat and a lot of black blight, but this year has been a fruitful union of the right seeds and the perfect weather.

 

 

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Much sparcer, and far more difficult to pick have been the first sloes from our garden. Sloe berries come from blackthorn and the bush is well named, as the thorns are hard and very spiney. This blackthorn bush self seeded into a corner of the garden that we didn’t mow, along with birch, willow, larch, budlia, plum, laurel, fir and even an oak sapling.

We let the wild patch alone and the blackthorn has grown big enough in 8 years to be covered in white flowers in the spring time and now thick with black fruit in the autumn. In England you don’t pick sloes until they are crisped by the first frost, but I have learnt from experience that in my corner of France/ Germany/Switzerland, if you wait until the first frost, the berries will have ripened and fallen off by then .

So in the wild corner of the garden I did mighty  battle with the thorns and picked enough fruit to turn a couple of bottles of gin into sloe gin for a treat this Christmas. They will do their frosting in the freezer and I will add them to gin and sugar next week.

So you see gardening for wildlife is not entirely altruistic after all!

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6 thoughts on “Easy pickings: prickly pickings!

  1. Flighty says:

    It’s been a good year for tomatoes, I picked the last of mine yesterday to ripen at home. Usually they would have suffered from blight long before now. I have a blackthorn on the plot so I know just how prickly they are, and I don’t bother picking the sloes. xx

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Jet Eliot says:

    Oh how I enjoyed reading about your experiences with the tomatoes and sloes and the self-seeders, Cathy. We don’t have sloe fruit in California, so I had to look it up. In the rose family, hmm, explains the thorns a bit. Very interesting, thank you.

    Like

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