In the shelter of a hedge.

This rose grows in the shadow of a thick hedge. It flowers each summer mostly ignored.

When a catastrophic hailstorm destroyed my garden a few days ago it was sheltered from the devastation and now its lone bloom is the most valued thing that there is left.

When we moved to our house 12 years ago, our new neighbours warned us about the hail storms that can trash everything in minutes and sighed at our desire to grow soft fruit and grapes. We listened politely and went ahead with planting raspberries and currants and vines. There were a few hail storms and one year we lost our potatoes, but nothing was too bad.

The thunder started early in the afternoon and went on for so long I just thought it was part of the music that was playing.

The hail stones were 2-3 cm in diameter. They broke plant pots, roof tiles and chipped off the plaster from the walls of the house. They bounced like ball barrings or frozen gob stoppers and smashed foliage as they fell. The lettuces were pulverised, the pumpkins, courgettes and green beans were pounded into the mud and the potato plants shredded into skeletons.

After spectacular lightening and yet more thunder, the heavens finally opened . Hail thundered down with a size and ferocity I have never encountered in any tropical country.

There is a single bud left on my lovely lilies . The peonies were atomised and my best ever year of roses were over in ten minutes of ice and biblical vengeance.

I have been clearing up as best I can but my garden is a very sorry sight.

The rose by the hedge was protected by the thick overhang and while the rest of the garden is broken and battered, this neglected rose escaped completely unharmed .

Gardens grow metaphors like weeds.

16 thoughts on “In the shelter of a hedge.

  1. afrenchgarden says:

    I have never experienced hail like you are describing. Winter gardens are often damaged by storms but it is not the same damage that must occur in the summertime. Perhaps you can buy some cheap and cheerful Cosmos just to add a bit of colour and give you a lift? Amelia

    Liked by 1 person

  2. rabbitpatchdiary.com says:

    I have been caught in a hail storm-hail is a serious event. I am sorry about your lovely garden. The life of a gardener is spent waiting, it seems. Late frosts have taught me that. Even your account of this tragedy, was written like a song. x Michele

    Liked by 1 person

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